Magic Garden

A steep path leads up to The Magic Garden. First, a small circular meadow, beyond this a mound or tump and beyond that the pasture fields, often dotted about with sheep, that lead to mixed hedgerows and down to the sea. Turning round and climbing onto the mound there is the magnificent view of Garn Fawr hillside, part of the Preseli uplands, rich in pre-history and from whence came the Bluestones for Stonehenge. You see now how the garden flows into the adjoining wild landscape. A garden without boundaries.
 

Here we are on the top of the bank, above the house, with views in all directions. It is in fact where the previous house was built and the remains of a 4’ wide wall can be seen at the far (North) end. The tone of this garden is set by the large group of rocks left by the last glacier that passed through about 10,000 years ago. We have been steadily clearing and revealing them.

Claire Takacs

Claire Takacs

There are few cultivated plants, the concentration is on rock, thorn, native wild plants and pasture grasses. Some mowing takes place to give direction and we made the grassy mound. Rocks emerge from the ground, from the rubble field wall and the end less reinstated portion of internal field wall.

Claire Takacs

Claire Takacs

Before The Quarry was quarried this field fell gently down to the far side with the track running along its south eastern edge. The whole garden slopes down from here to the stream, the Fernant, at the bottom of the valley where there is a marked difference in situation and atmosphere. The garden sits between these two extremes.

Claire Takacs

Claire Takacs


 

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